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20121205
20121213
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)
"/abc poll of handling of fiscal cliff negotiations, obama, 47% approve, 46% disapprove. boehner, 24% approve. 54% disapprove. i would say, the republican party continues to have a branding problem. >> there is. >> or a disintegrating problem in washington. >> it is a branding problem that was born of chaos in the primary process that continues. there is a great "politico" article that actually talks about the republican problem with branding. and talks about -- >> it's a great piece. >> have you seen this? >> yeah. >> the republican party has a branding problem. these are researchers that say -- we asked 22, 23 different topics, whether americans related more to the democratic party or the republican party. 22 of the 23, they appeal more to democrats. >> yeah. >> it is a generalized, massive branding problem over what's happened nationally over the past year. >> except in the south. >> the piece, in part, points out that unlike people who sit around here, most people, normal people out there in america react emotionally to politics when they hear phrases, they react emotionally. does this re
looking for work. earlier today on capitol hill john boehner commented on the fiscal cliff negotiations with reporters. >> this isn't a progress report because there is no progress to report. when it comes to the fiscal cliff that is threatening our economy and jobs the white house has wastde another week. secretary gitener came here to offer a plan that had twice the tax hikes that the president campaigned on and had more stimulus spending thanned the in cuts. and an indefinite increase in the debt limit like for ever. now four days ago we offered a serious proposal based on testimony of president clinton's former chief of staff. since then there has been no count offer from the white house. instead reports indicate that the president has adopted a deliberate stradgeji to slow walk our economy right to the edge of the fiscal cliff. instead of reforming the tax code and cutting spending, the president wants to raise tax rates. but even if the president got the tax rate hike that he wanted, understand that we would continue to see trillion dollar deficits for as far as the eye can see. w
to be a lot of fiscal cliff negotiations privately going on throughout the day. or else maybe he's going back to ohio. who knows. jay carney will have a briefing at 1:00 and i will be there and i will tell you all about it tomorrow. oh my goodness! oh my gosh this looks amazing! [ male announcer ] our new maine stays! 15 entrees under $15 seafood, chicken and more! oo! the tilapia with roasted vegetables! i'm actually looking at the wood grilled chicken with portobello wine sauce. that pork chop was great! no more fast food friday's! we're going to go to red lobster. yep. [ male announcer ] come try our new menu and sea food differently! and introducing 7 lunch choices for just $7.99. salad, sandwiches, and more. [ ♪ theme ♪ ] >> bill: hello friends and neighbors, fellow americans good morning and welcome to the "full court press." here on current tv. it is tuesday morning. december 11. i'm bill press. liberal and proud of it. proud to bring you the only progressive morning show anywhere on cable television. called the "full cour
today. it's over. why inject the politics? why go there? with so much going on, the fiscal cliff, negotiating back and forth with the house trying to figure out how to avoid massive tax increases and spending cuts, why there? it's all politics. >> steve: one other note, the "wall street journal" says regarding right to work states, between 2000 and 2010, 5 million people moved from union states to right to work states and they have 23% higher rate of income growth per capita in right to work states. so things are thriving in the right to work states. there are 24 of them. 26 still are union states. >> gretchen: eric brought up an interesting point about why isn't the president staying in washington, because now it turns out that the fiscal cliff is actually closer than we thought. it was not coakley january 1 anymore. we've about to go off it any day now because apparently it takes a certain amount of days to actually draft any kind of legislation that they might come to an agreement on and so if you backtrack then from the end of the year and when congress is going to be going h
tonight, we'll update negotiations aimed at avoiding the fiscal cliff. >> ifill: then, we look at michigan's debate over right-to- work laws which would prevent labor unions from requiring membership. >> woodruff: paul solman explores the tax deductions that could be on the chopping block in the quest to bring down the deficit. >> we estimate $1.1 trillion a year in revenue the government gives up because of all the tax breaks. that's enough to solve the revenue problem but it's not going to happen. >> ifill: ray suarez has a newsmaker interview with secretary of homeland security janet napolitano. >> you can discuss border security and immigration reform simultaneously now. we don't have to this kind of first this and then that. at this point they actually go together. >> woodruff: special correspondent rick karr reports on the polluted waters that spilled into new york homes and businesses in superstorm sandy, raising health concerns. >> everybody sort of got sick at the same time. all of us sort of attributed it to, well, we're all stressed out. it's very cold. but that said, there is a
here, forget fiscal cliff, forget negotiations. you just look economically, raise taxes, you don't get all the money you think you are going to bring in. >> brian: real quick, kevin mccarthy, one of the young guns, was on "metropolitan the press" and said, good news. revenues are up 10%. that's because we seem to be turning around economically. here is the bad news, spending is up 16%. why? he's trying to explain to a very reluctant david gregory, why should we consider raising tax when is clearly the revenue is up, but the spending is up higher? >> the president wants to raise tax rates on people making more than 250,000. he thinks that will bring in $82 billion in one year. the experience of california and other countries is that you will not bring in $82 billion. you bring in less. >> brian: sadly, it's just about getting a trophy and saying i told you i would do it. >> that's the politics of it. >> brian: varney and company might want to pick this up at 9:20 eastern time. >> always take your advice. >> brian: i'll put it in writing. >> thank you. >> brian: three minutes before the
, after resuming negotiations with the speaker of the house on a fiscal cliff agreement. and egypt's islamist president deployed troops outside the presidential palace amid growing protests against a referendum on a new constitution. and online we kick off a week- long look at how the developing world is tackling cancer. hari sreenivasan is here again. >> sreenivasan: more people die from cancer in low- and middle- income countries than from tuberculosis, hiv/aids, and malaria combined, but the fight against the deadly class of diseases has just begun there. see the first in our five-part series on our health page. and today our social security sage, larry kotlikoff, offers advice for outliving your money. that's on the business desk. and in our science roundup, find the perfect gift for your budding chemists and biologists, including a toy made from an owl's lunch. all that and more is on our web site, newshour.pbs.org. gwen? >> ifill: and that's the newshour for tonight. on tuesday, we'll look at the raging political turmoil in egypt. i'm gwen ifill. >> woodruff: and i'm judy woo
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)